JP Morales

Strategic Project Management

I create, manage, and lead design process-driven teams.

More About Me

I'm a Project Manager specializing in the production of digital experiences and information services. I like inscrutable books, emerging technology, indie music, and world politics. This is my business card on the internet.

Close

Tumblr

Previous Next

Culture & Data

The overwhelming factor regarding data,is that data and culture are aligned in more ways than we care to know, or think about in daily life.  Edwards ( A Vast Machine, 2010), states that nothing which is observed can become global in time or space without first passing through a series of data models, inferring that data is not only a part of culture, but central to it. Data, as he states, binds models to measurable realities, that is to say, data is necessary to turn something theoretical, into something which is actual and which has a measurable impact in reality.

Edwards refers to the effort to accumulate information on certain topics the making of global data, and the conclusions drawn from this collection of informational data over time. He also refers to data friction, a term which describes the difficulty, the friction, of collecting data, due to infrastructural complexities. Data is so vast and varying, that often it is complicated turning something so convoluted into something meaningful, relatable and reality based, so that it can form a part of cultural algorithms.

And infrastructural globalism? What is that all about? Edward concludes that “to be modern is to live within and by means of infrastructures”, which exist in a naturalised background. The creation of infrastructures in order to collect and classify data, in turn creates linked networks of global infrastructure, which share ideologies.

As culture changes and adapts, so does what governs culture, data and our interpretation of it. As new data structures and theories are constantly being created, and data being re arranged, there will never be one definite and absolute way of viewing data, within a specific cultural understanding. Data analysis leads to cultural analysis, with the convergence of culture into data, and the overlapping of both.

Why you need to learn to write shorter emails

anshultewari:

I get a ton of emails from people, non-profits talking about an issue they’ve been working on, or about a new project they’ve just started. While at the outset it is a great strategy to email your network about the same - where these organizations fail is the length of the email.

Good communicators know well that lean, vibrant writing is any day better than verbose rambled commentary.

When you send an incredibly long email, you leave very little space for your call to action, or for the person at the receiving end to respond back on time - or respond at all, for that matter.

I am sure all of the content in that email is extremely important - but you need to understand that long emails represent failure of communication - unless they are the only way in.

But here’s a rule: A long email is never necessary. NEVER!

No matter how you use email, or for whatever purpose, no one you’re emailing wants to read long emails - they are long, they take too much of the reader’s time, you don’t get to the point, you ask too many questions, I won’t respond.

Email Rule #1: Keep your email to 5 sentences.

I know you just said “Are you crazy!!!??!?!11 I have so much to tell” but trust me, keep it to 5 sentences and see how things roll in your favour - how you start getting responses and how your call to action becomes more effective.

How do you achieve a 5 sentence email - stick to the following questions:

1) Who are you?

2) What do you want?

3) Why should you get it?

4) When do you need them to act? — in this order.

Email rule #2: Figure out, and stick to your main agenda.

Best way to figure this out is to understand whether you need more than 5 sentences to complete your email or not. If you do, then you haven’t figured out your agenda.

Email rule #3: No more than one question.

Ask only one question. Don’t fluster the person with multiple answers that s/he might have to give.

Email rule #4: Link it. If there is much much more information you need the reader to know, then add a link to it on the web. Make sure your email is concise and effective to get them to your link.

If you do not have a place to put information on the web to link up to - go get a blog or put it up on your website - if you don’t have one - get one.

Email rule #5: The best way to learn how to write short emails is to become an active user of Twitter. Twitter gives you lesser space, thus you have to work harder to prioritize your thoughts.

image

Simply Explained: Agile Project Management

If you’ve been hearing about agile project management a lot and have no idea what it’s all about, this article will help you understand it in layman’s terms.

Article Body:

Agile project management is a term that may be unfamiliar to a lot of people. In essence, it’s a type of project planning wherein the project manager is not the one who dictates the tasks. While this approach does still require the presence of a project manager, his task is to manage a team of leaders who are the ones who dictate the tasks of their own sub-teams.

It may seem strange to have a project manager even though there are already several leaders in the project team, but the purpose of the project manager is to create a high level plan. This plan serves as an overview of sorts for the project, and it is from there that the project is broken down into bite-sized chunks of tasks.

These tasks will then be assigned to the leaders, who will then determine what each division needs to do in order to complete their set of tasks. This aspect of agile project management is what makes it different from other more traditional project planning methods. Each team’s leader has the authority and is expected to create their own plans, without the project manager dictating it to them, and find out what their team needs to acquire and to actually do.

Despite this appearance of autonomy, each individual team makes a significant impact on the project’s overall quality and delivery. If one team falls behind schedule, it could cause delays for the entire project.

The advantage of this agile project management setup is that the team leader of each division can make crucial decisions on their own, without having to go back-and-forth with the project manager to consult with them or get their permission to do things. For example, if his division’s supplies are running low and he needs to place a new order for them, he can just make the order himself rather than have to inform the project manager, ask for permission to make the order, and wait for the manager’s response before he makes that order. This ensures that work flows continuously without being disrupted by waiting for other people’s responses, which saves them a lot of time that is usually wasted in more traditional set-ups.

Another great aspect of agile project management is its highly flexible, interactive, and adaptable planning and monitoring process. Each division hast to report their progress in real time using a specified program or report format, which can then be viewed by the project manager and other team leaders so that they can get a feel of how the project is going. This very open information and reporting setup allows all the people involved in the project to easily adapt to changing situations in the project environment, and to react quickly if something goes awry.

And that’s what agile project management is, in a nutshell. While you may think that this will only work in large-scale projects that have a lot of people working on it, even small projects can benefit from this kind of management, so long as there are multiple teams or individuals are involved.

This article is merely a brief overview of agile management, simplified so as not to overwhelm those of you who know nothing about it. You can always go online to find out more about it, or read books to help enhance your understanding of this method. Who knows – maybe someday you’ll wind up spearheading a project in the future, and you might find that this method will save your company a lot of money, time, and other resources, and also foster a sense of responsibility and camaraderie between your team members.

fastcompany:

Even if you haven’t heard of the Artefact, you’ve seen their work. A hired gun for design by companies like Google, Apple and Amazon, their influence crops up in everything from Xboxes to HTC’s latest smartphones. (They’ve also created intriguing design concepts that we’ve seen here and here and here.)
Now the company is going through a bit of a transition, from pure consulting work to creating products of its own.
A Project Management Tool Built By Some Of The Country’s Best Design Firms
Zoom Info
fastcompany:

Even if you haven’t heard of the Artefact, you’ve seen their work. A hired gun for design by companies like Google, Apple and Amazon, their influence crops up in everything from Xboxes to HTC’s latest smartphones. (They’ve also created intriguing design concepts that we’ve seen here and here and here.)
Now the company is going through a bit of a transition, from pure consulting work to creating products of its own.
A Project Management Tool Built By Some Of The Country’s Best Design Firms
Zoom Info
fastcompany:

Even if you haven’t heard of the Artefact, you’ve seen their work. A hired gun for design by companies like Google, Apple and Amazon, their influence crops up in everything from Xboxes to HTC’s latest smartphones. (They’ve also created intriguing design concepts that we’ve seen here and here and here.)
Now the company is going through a bit of a transition, from pure consulting work to creating products of its own.
A Project Management Tool Built By Some Of The Country’s Best Design Firms
Zoom Info
fastcompany:

Even if you haven’t heard of the Artefact, you’ve seen their work. A hired gun for design by companies like Google, Apple and Amazon, their influence crops up in everything from Xboxes to HTC’s latest smartphones. (They’ve also created intriguing design concepts that we’ve seen here and here and here.)
Now the company is going through a bit of a transition, from pure consulting work to creating products of its own.
A Project Management Tool Built By Some Of The Country’s Best Design Firms
Zoom Info

fastcompany:

Even if you haven’t heard of the Artefact, you’ve seen their work. A hired gun for design by companies like Google, Apple and Amazon, their influence crops up in everything from Xboxes to HTC’s latest smartphones. (They’ve also created intriguing design concepts that we’ve seen here and here and here.)

Now the company is going through a bit of a transition, from pure consulting work to creating products of its own.

A Project Management Tool Built By Some Of The Country’s Best Design Firms

Back to Top

Get in touch with me

Previous Next
Back to Top

Instagram

Previous Next
Load More Photos
Back to Top

Copyright © 2013